Heart Soul Veryness
Deuteronomy 6:4-9
Main Idea: Based on Yahweh's covenant with his people they must love him with all their hearts, soul...
Published June 1st, 2012
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This page was automatically converted from a module that was shared prior to the release of Published Pages. Additionally, the arc below was auto-converted from the arc created by the author (which used the old module), and so it is possible there are misplaced logical relationships.
notes 1452680585301 Disclaimer This page was automatically converted from a module that was shared prior to the release of Published Pages. Additionally, the arc below was auto-converted from the arc created by the author (which used the old module), and so it is possible there are misplaced logical relationships.
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2010-03-09 15:12:41
2010-03-18 09:01:35
Main Idea: Based on Yahweh's covenant with his people they must love him with all their hearts, souls and veryness and keep his word central in their lives. Exegetical Outline A Call to obey Yahweh based on the covenant he made with his people (5:1–6:3) Hear the command of Yahweh and learn them to obey them (5:1) Because of the covenant Yahweh made with you (5:2–31) Yahweh spoke face to face with you (5:2–5) Yahweh demanded full alligiance from you (5:6–11) Yahweh called you to keep the sabbath (5:12–15) Yahweh called you to honor your parents (5:16) Yahweh called you to faithfulness in the way you relate to each other (5:17–22) Israel out of fear asked for a mediator (5:23–27) Yahweh gave the commandments to the mediator Moses (5:28–31) Hear the command of Yaweh and learn them to obey them for your good (5:32–6:3) A call to whole hearted love for Yahweh based on his uniqueness (6:4–9) Only Yahweh Israel's God is God (6:4) So his people must love him with their whole beings (6:5) So Yahweh's words must be central in the live of his covenant people (6:6–9) Questions Why does the LXX renderמְאֹדֶךָ as δυνάμεώς. Is the LXX taking "veryness" to mean power. If so, why? Note that All NT writers follow the LXX. It seems unclear why the LXX renders "מְאֹדֶךָ " as "δυνάμεώς." Blomberg states that "strength [the LXX rendering of "amad"] actually translates a word that normally means 'greatly' or 'exceedingly.' One might thus render the entire verse, 'Love the Lord your God with total commitment (heart), with your total self (soul), to total excess.' Loving God should be 'over the top" (Commentary on the NT's use of the OT, 80–81). The New Testament writers seem to follow the LXX but with some changes. Mark follows the LXX but uses a different word in place of 'δυνάμεώς.' He uses 'ischus.' Matthew does not have Mark's "with all your strength" but preserves Marks addition of "διανοίᾳ" (mind). Blomberg argues, "Given that 'dianoia was a frequent Greek rendering of the Hebrew for "heart,' the meaning of the original Deuteronomic text is scarcely altered by any of these changes" (Commentary on the NT's use of the OT, 81). It is possible that the Gospel writters read the Hebrew and LXX and sought to maintain the sense of the Hebrew original by expanding the hebrew word with other words (mind, strength). Bascon argues, as quoted in the Commentary on the NT's use of the OT, that the expanded synoptic forms actually better bring out in Greek the meaning of the Hebrew original. This, however, does not answer the question why the LXX renders the hebew the way it does. HALOT suggests that when "מְאֹדֶךָ " is used substantivally it can mean strength (“מְאֹד,” HALOT, 2:538.). It is possibly why the LXX renders it that way. Why the call to hear "Hear O Israel" when Israel is already listening? What implications does this have for what follows? The Call to hear when they are already listening is probably to for emphasis. The call to hear lays emphasis on the material that follows. Why are all the calls for Israel to here "Hear O Israel" only found in Deuteronomy except once in Genesis? How do the asyndetic forms of this call relate to each other in Deuteronomy? The emphasis and repeated call for Israel to hear the Commandments of Yahweh found almost exclusively in Deuteronomy among the books of the Pentateuch is because Israel is about to enter the promised Land. Since life in the land was conditioned on Israel's obedience to Yahweh, it was important that at the brink of the entrance into the land they should be called to hear repeatedly what Yahweh has to say. What is unique about the imperative "Hear" directed to Israel? It is used with Israel as the object in Deuteronomy 4:1, 5:1, 6:4, 9:1, 20:3, 27:9; Joshua 3:9; Isaiah 44:1, 46:3, 48:1,12; Jeremiah 2:4, 10:1, 19:3, 42:15; Ezekiel 6:3, 18:25, 36:1,4; Hosea 4:1, 5:1; Amos 3:1, 5:1; Micah 3:1, 3:9; Psalm 50:7, 81:8(9MT); 2 Chronicles 13:4. What is unique about these texts. Why is there a greater concentration in Deuteronomy, Jeremiah and Ezekiel? It seems that in most of the context of these references Yahweh is either cautioning, admonishing, or judging his people for sin. In Isaiah, most of the references Yahweh is boasting about his uniqueness and declares the plans he has for Israel. All the reference in Isaiah have a positive tune. The focus on Deuteronomy, Jeremiah and Ezekiel might be because of the constant failure of the people of Israel thus Yahweh calls on them regularly to hear his words. Noteworthy about these books is that they are the books with the most explicit New Covenant promises in the OT. That the call to hear which is mostly because of the failure or the propencity to fail, in these books with the promises about the New Covenant is to show the greatness of the New Covenant over against the Old Covenant that could not be kept.
10000000028934 28934 Notes 2010-03-09 15:12:41 2010-03-18 09:01:35 Main Idea: Based on Yahweh's covenant with his people they must love him with all their hearts, souls and veryness and keep his word central in their lives. Exegetical Outline A Call to obey Yahweh based on the covenant he made with his people (5:1–6:3) Hear the command of Yahweh and learn them to obey them (5:1) Because of the covenant Yahweh made with you (5:2–31) Yahweh spoke face to face with you (5:2–5) Yahweh demanded full alligiance from you (5:6–11) Yahweh called you to keep the sabbath (5:12–15) Yahweh called you to honor your parents (5:16) Yahweh called you to faithfulness in the way you relate to each other (5:17–22) Israel out of fear asked for a mediator (5:23–27) Yahweh gave the commandments to the mediator Moses (5:28–31) Hear the command of Yaweh and learn them to obey them for your good (5:32–6:3) A call to whole hearted love for Yahweh based on his uniqueness (6:4–9) Only Yahweh Israel's God is God (6:4) So his people must love him with their whole beings (6:5) So Yahweh's words must be central in the live of his covenant people (6:6–9) Questions Why does the LXX renderמְאֹדֶךָ as δυνάμεώς. Is the LXX taking "veryness" to mean power. If so, why? Note that All NT writers follow the LXX. It seems unclear why the LXX renders "מְאֹדֶךָ " as "δυνάμεώς." Blomberg states that "strength [the LXX rendering of "amad"] actually translates a word that normally means 'greatly' or 'exceedingly.' One might thus render the entire verse, 'Love the Lord your God with total commitment (heart), with your total self (soul), to total excess.' Loving God should be 'over the top" (Commentary on the NT's use of the OT, 80–81). The New Testament writers seem to follow the LXX but with some changes. Mark follows the LXX but uses a different word in place of 'δυνάμεώς.' He uses 'ischus.' Matthew does not have Mark's "with all your strength" but preserves Marks addition of "διανοίᾳ" (mind). Blomberg argues, "Given that 'dianoia was a frequent Greek rendering of the Hebrew for "heart,' the meaning of the original Deuteronomic text is scarcely altered by any of these changes" (Commentary on the NT's use of the OT, 81). It is possible that the Gospel writters read the Hebrew and LXX and sought to maintain the sense of the Hebrew original by expanding the hebrew word with other words (mind, strength). Bascon argues, as quoted in the Commentary on the NT's use of the OT, that the expanded synoptic forms actually better bring out in Greek the meaning of the Hebrew original. This, however, does not answer the question why the LXX renders the hebew the way it does. HALOT suggests that when "מְאֹדֶךָ " is used substantivally it can mean strength (“מְאֹד,” HALOT, 2:538.). It is possibly why the LXX renders it that way. Why the call to hear "Hear O Israel" when Israel is already listening? What implications does this have for what follows? The Call to hear when they are already listening is probably to for emphasis. The call to hear lays emphasis on the material that follows. Why are all the calls for Israel to here "Hear O Israel" only found in Deuteronomy except once in Genesis? How do the asyndetic forms of this call relate to each other in Deuteronomy? The emphasis and repeated call for Israel to hear the Commandments of Yahweh found almost exclusively in Deuteronomy among the books of the Pentateuch is because Israel is about to enter the promised Land. Since life in the land was conditioned on Israel's obedience to Yahweh, it was important that at the brink of the entrance into the land they should be called to hear repeatedly what Yahweh has to say. What is unique about the imperative "Hear" directed to Israel? It is used with Israel as the object in Deuteronomy 4:1, 5:1, 6:4, 9:1, 20:3, 27:9; Joshua 3:9; Isaiah 44:1, 46:3, 48:1,12; Jeremiah 2:4, 10:1, 19:3, 42:15; Ezekiel 6:3, 18:25, 36:1,4; Hosea 4:1, 5:1; Amos 3:1, 5:1; Micah 3:1, 3:9; Psalm 50:7, 81:8(9MT); 2 Chronicles 13:4. What is unique about these texts. Why is there a greater concentration in Deuteronomy, Jeremiah and Ezekiel? It seems that in most of the context of these references Yahweh is either cautioning, admonishing, or judging his people for sin. In Isaiah, most of the references Yahweh is boasting about his uniqueness and declares the plans he has for Israel. All the reference in Isaiah have a positive tune. The focus on Deuteronomy, Jeremiah and Ezekiel might be because of the constant failure of the people of Israel thus Yahweh calls on them regularly to hear his words. Noteworthy about these books is that they are the books with the most explicit New Covenant promises in the OT. That the call to hear which is mostly because of the failure or the propencity to fail, in these books with the promises about the New Covenant is to show the greatness of the New Covenant over against the Old Covenant that could not be kept. notes
Arc
2010-03-09 15:12:41
2010-03-18 09:01:35
editing
Deuteronomy
Deuteronomy 6:4-9
OT
wlc
שְׁמַע יִשְׂרָאֵל
יְהוָה אֱלֹהֵינוּ יְהוָה אֶחָד׃
ideaexplanation
וְאָהַבְתָּ אֵת יְהוָה אֱלֹהֶיךָ
בְּכָל־לְבָבְךָ
וּבְכָל־נַפְשְׁךָ
וּבְכָל־מְאֹדֶךָ׃
actionmanner
inference
וְהָיוּ הַדְּבָרִים הָאֵלֶּה
אֲשֶׁר אָנֹכִי מְצַוְּךָ הַיֹּום
עַל־לְבָבֶךָ׃
locative
וְשִׁנַּנְתָּם לְבָנֶיךָ
וְדִבַּרְתָּ בָּם
בְּשִׁבְתְּךָ בְּבֵיתֶךָ
וּבְלֶכְתְּךָ בַדֶּרֶךְ
וּבְשָׁכְבְּךָ
וּבְקוּמֶךָ׃
temporal
וּקְשַׁרְתָּם לְאֹות עַל־יָדֶךָ
וְהָיוּ לְטֹטָפֹת בֵּין עֵינֶיךָ׃
series
וּכְתַבְתָּם עַל־מְזוּזֹת בֵּיתֶךָ וּבִשְׁעָרֶיךָ׃ ס
actionpurpose
actionresult
discourse
10000000028934 28934 Arc 2010-03-09 15:12:41 2010-03-18 09:01:35 editing Deuteronomy 6 4 6 9 Deuteronomy 6:4-9 5 OT wlc i14203 i14204 i14205 i14185 שְׁמַע יִשְׂרָאֵל i14186 יְהוָה אֱלֹהֵינוּ יְהוָה אֶחָד׃ ideaexplanation 1 i14206 i14187 וְאָהַבְתָּ אֵת יְהוָה אֱלֹהֶיךָ i14207 i14188 בְּכָל־לְבָבְךָ i14189 וּבְכָל־נַפְשְׁךָ i14190 וּבְכָל־מְאֹדֶךָ׃ actionmanner 1 inference 2 i14208 i14209 i14210 i14191 וְהָיוּ הַדְּבָרִים הָאֵלֶּה i14192 אֲשֶׁר אָנֹכִי מְצַוְּךָ הַיֹּום ideaexplanation 1 i14193 עַל־לְבָבֶךָ׃ locative 1 i14211 i14194 וְשִׁנַּנְתָּם לְבָנֶיךָ i14212 i14195 וְדִבַּרְתָּ בָּם i14213 i14196 בְּשִׁבְתְּךָ בְּבֵיתֶךָ i14197 וּבְלֶכְתְּךָ בַדֶּרֶךְ i14198 וּבְשָׁכְבְּךָ i14199 וּבְקוּמֶךָ׃ temporal 1 i14214 i14215 i14200 וּקְשַׁרְתָּם לְאֹות עַל־יָדֶךָ i14201 וְהָיוּ לְטֹטָפֹת בֵּין עֵינֶיךָ׃ series i14202 וּכְתַבְתָּם עַל־מְזוּזֹת בֵּיתֶךָ וּבִשְׁעָרֶיךָ׃ ס series actionpurpose 2 actionresult 2 1 1 1 wlc 25 a 50 discourse
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