Author
Marcus Leman
User since 2009
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Arc.
Jeremiah 31:31-34
Passage Commentary : This two part psalm of ascent has long been a prayer of mine.
Psalms 126:1-6
Passage Commentary : Perhaps I've overdone it, perhaps I've read into the text, but there seems to b...
Mark 4:13-20
Passage Commentary:: (soon to follow) Arc Commentary:: One of the clearest and most important relati...
Ephesians 1:3-14
Passage Commentary :: The concessive at the beginning of this passage has tremendous weight for inte...
Deuteronomy 17:14-20
Passage Commentary :: The two Ac/Pur clauses make clear the main point of this passage.
Ephesians 1:15-23
Passage Commentary :: A little context might help us here.
Exodus 20:20
Passage Commentary :: The logic of this passage relates in two main ways.
Ephesians 2:1-10
Passage Commentary :: This whole unit, perhaps even ch.
Ephesians 4:1-16
Passage Commentary :: Paul is entering into a prayer of intercession to wrap up the massive theology he's presented in ch.
Ephesians 3:14-21
Passage Commentary :: This is a powerful passage about God's reconciling work rooted in the peace-ma...
Ephesians 2:11-22
Passage Commentary :: Paul's desire in this passage seems to be two-fold.
Ephesians 3:1-13
A
Ephesians 4:25-5:2
Passage Commentary :: The main point of this passage is that believers are not to conduct themselves...
Ephesians 4:17-24
A
Ephesians 5:22-33
Arc Commentary :: There are two main units in this passage: vv.
Ephesians 6:1-9
Arc Commentary :: The major contour of this passage are two command/explanations grounded in a single truth that the days are evil.
Ephesians 5:15-21
A
Ephesians 5:3-14
A
Ephesians 6:10-20
Arc Commentary :: This passage breaks nicely into two larger sections: vv.
Ephesians 6:21-24
Exegetical Questions 1) How shall we best translate the datives of v.
Romans 9:1-5
1) Is the ὁτι in
Romans 9:6-13
As I'm currently understanding this passage, the core reason why God is righteous is that He works a...
Romans 9:14-18
    Text Critical Notes v.
Romans 9:24-29
[
Romans 9:30-33
An Attempt at Capturing the Sense of the Arc :: "Brothers, (in light of Israel's massive rejection o...
Romans 10:1-4
(
Romans 10:5-13
Main Idea :: Paul is still unpacking his desire to see Israelites come to their Messiah back in 10:1.
Romans 10:14-21
Main Idea :: Paul's main question of concern in this unit, having just quote some scathing scripture...
Romans 11:1-6
Main Idea :: v.
Romans 11:7-10
Main Idea :: I see the central thrust of this unit coming out most clearly in v.
Romans 11:11-16
Main Idea :: The central point Paul is making in this passage is found in v.
Romans 11:16-24
MAIN POINT :: vv.
Romans 11:25-32
Main Point :: God's riches, wisdom, and knowledge are deep beyond comprehension ultimately because e...
Romans 11:33-36
God-dependent yields a gospel-displaying life.
Deuteronomy 4:5-8
Main Purpose: To lay a foundational paradigm in which Israel should live out love to YHWH, the supreme and only God.
Deuteronomy 6:4-9
Main Purpose : To illustrate the way in which parents should instruct their children in the purpose of the commandments.
Deuteronomy 6:20-25
Main Purpose: This passage is given to warn the people of Israel against temptations that are sure t...
Deuteronomy 6:10-19
Exegetical Outline Main Purpose: YHWH promises to bless Israel and clear away their enemies, but it ...
Deuteronomy 7:12-26
Main Purpose : Giving an illustration of the third unit of the שׁמע, this unit seeks to give clea...
Deuteronomy 7:1-11
Main Purpose: To offer Israel a warning, motivation, and means for dealing with the deadly temptations of experiencing bounty.
Deuteronomy 8:7-20
Main Purpose : To aid in the present generation maintaining fidelity to the covenant, Moses motivate...
Deuteronomy 8:1-6
The main point of the text is made emphatically and repetitiously in v.
Deuteronomy 16:18-20
Two main charges are given in this text: -Israel must only choose a King from among their brothers (Israel) whom God has appointed to lead.
Deuteronomy 17:14-17
Main Point :: Israel (the first generation) did not receive the ability to perceive the truth about ...
Deuteronomy 29:2-6
Main Point :: In keeping with the foundation of this covenant, YHWH will lead Israel and they will be careful to follow his lead.
Deuteronomy 26:16-19
Main Point :: YHWH will raise up another prophet like Moses who will speak the very words of YHWH; t...
Deuteronomy 18:15-19
The main point of this greater text, though 30:1-10 should be included, is that Moses is giving thes...
Deuteronomy 30:11-20
view all (49 total)
Grace that Never Fails
Romans 9:19-23
Exegetical Questions 1) How is the argument functioning between vv.
Published June 1st, 2012
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This page was automatically converted from a module that was shared prior to the release of Published Pages. Additionally, the arc below was auto-converted from the arc created by the author (which used the old module), and so it is possible there are misplaced logical relationships.
notes 1452680587090 Disclaimer This page was automatically converted from a module that was shared prior to the release of Published Pages. Additionally, the arc below was auto-converted from the arc created by the author (which used the old module), and so it is possible there are misplaced logical relationships.
Notes
2010-10-23 10:19:43
2011-05-09 15:48:08
Exegetical Questions 1) How is the argument functioning between vv.19-21? This passage begins with a question that Paul anticipates coming from his opponent. Perhaps he had heard this before or perhaps he just knew how the human heart reacts to the free sovereignty of God. Either way, Paul answers the question two ways. First, he responds to the manner in which the question is asked. It is not a humble inquiry into the ways of God, it is a self-justifying question. But Paul is not on a self-justifying mission in this chapter, he is on a mission to “justify” God. Second, Paul asks his own questions, one expecting a negative answer (introduced by μὴ) and one expecting a positive answer (introduced by οὐκ). I’ve construed these responses as a sort of ground for Paul’s first response. - The opponent asks his question and grounds it. Paul responds to such an arrogant tone and doubly grounds it with his own questions. “Who are you to be answering back to God - O man made out of dust! Doesn’t a potter working with clay have the authority to make whatever he wants? How much more so the one who speaks clay and dust into existence, sustaining them every moment by the word of his power?” So, Paul is first responding to the question more than answering it. In verses 22-23 he offers an answer slightly more direct. 2) What is the significance of the passive participle κατηρτισμένα in v.22 and the active verb προητοίμασεν in v.23? Piper (JOG 213) - “though God does accomplish all things by the counsel of his will, he does not bring about all things in the same way. In the accomplishment of some things he employs intermediary agents perhaps. Or to put it another way, his heart is engaged differently in different acts...” What I gather from this short quote is that the way Paul talks about these sovereign acts of God is just as important as what the acts are themselves. To borrow language from Jonathan Edwards, God has ultimate ends and subordinate ends in all he does. Thus, the way Paul talks here shows us that the display of wrath is a subordinate ends and the display of mercy is an ultimate end. This is further shown in how he uses the participle θέλων to speak about wrath and the ἵνα construction to speak about mercy. These both introduce purpose clauses but one is more direct and more clearly ultimate than the other. We would do well to learn from Paul’s example here! Application Questions 1) What is the connection between honor and glory? dishonor and wrath? I think Paul very clearly wants his readers, hearers, and opponents to see that he intends a connection between “vessels unto honor” and “vessels of mercy”, likewise intending a connection between “vessels unto dishonor” and “vessels of wrath”. If this connection is true then for the vessels of mercy, we are intended by the potter to display his glory in our humble dependence upon him for life and salvation. So then, let us worship with our faces to the dust as our brother Job, let us remember that we are but dust. It is not for us to dispute with the Maker, “why have you made me thusly?” We are vessels of mercy, worship God for his mercy! It’s what all vessels are made for, but not all will display it the same way. And we ought never consign others over to being vessels of wrath. I often hear this with regard to Muslims. “They are so evil and so anti-Christ that we shouldn’t even bother going to tell them the good news. Let them read it on the internet or something, they don’t deserve more than that!” Sadly I hear a similar presumption in this reasoning as I hear in Paul’s opponent, not his anguish of heart in 9:1-5. Being a vessel of mercy means that we ought also extend mercy, even to the point of our own death at the hands of other vessels. Willingness to be martyred for Christ is toll of mercy’s mighty bell. It resounds far longer than a voice and far clearer than a book. O God, bring us into accord with who the Gospel has called us to be, vessels of mercy for your praise and vessels of mercy for the sake of the nations, that they might taste this immeasurable mercy that we know in Christ! 2) How shall we then worship God in light of these truths? Paraphrase: Put your face back in the dust And know from whence you came Dare not call your God unjust But bow and bless his name For from all the ages past He is free, He is free To display his awesome wrath And his lavish mercy Grace That Never Fails By: Marcus Leman O wretched sinner come, come to the Lord your Judge; But come with joy if you do come in Jesus’ blood. His death has made a way that sin and death may die; Believe His promise, trust in Him, He does not lie. The Lord above is kind, His patience does abide, But when the judgment call goes out, who then may hide? God’s holy law remains; His righteousness is sure, Forbearance over sin abounds but won’t endure. O Christian take your peace, our great High Priest does see And stands before His Father’s throne to intercede. Another Comforter He sent to be our guide; His Spirit gives us victory o’er sin’s dark night. What grace that never fails, now pouring from above, Like rain from endless storehouses of steadfast love! It carries us along, though sin and foe assail, To meet with our Lord Jesus Christ beyond the veil. To the Tune: LEONI The Synagogue melody; arr. Meyer Lyon, c. 1770
10000000054215 54215 Notes 2010-10-23 10:19:43 2011-05-09 15:48:08 Exegetical Questions 1) How is the argument functioning between vv.19-21? This passage begins with a question that Paul anticipates coming from his opponent. Perhaps he had heard this before or perhaps he just knew how the human heart reacts to the free sovereignty of God. Either way, Paul answers the question two ways. First, he responds to the manner in which the question is asked. It is not a humble inquiry into the ways of God, it is a self-justifying question. But Paul is not on a self-justifying mission in this chapter, he is on a mission to “justify” God. Second, Paul asks his own questions, one expecting a negative answer (introduced by μὴ) and one expecting a positive answer (introduced by οὐκ). I’ve construed these responses as a sort of ground for Paul’s first response. - The opponent asks his question and grounds it. Paul responds to such an arrogant tone and doubly grounds it with his own questions. “Who are you to be answering back to God - O man made out of dust! Doesn’t a potter working with clay have the authority to make whatever he wants? How much more so the one who speaks clay and dust into existence, sustaining them every moment by the word of his power?” So, Paul is first responding to the question more than answering it. In verses 22-23 he offers an answer slightly more direct. 2) What is the significance of the passive participle κατηρτισμένα in v.22 and the active verb προητοίμασεν in v.23? Piper (JOG 213) - “though God does accomplish all things by the counsel of his will, he does not bring about all things in the same way. In the accomplishment of some things he employs intermediary agents perhaps. Or to put it another way, his heart is engaged differently in different acts...” What I gather from this short quote is that the way Paul talks about these sovereign acts of God is just as important as what the acts are themselves. To borrow language from Jonathan Edwards, God has ultimate ends and subordinate ends in all he does. Thus, the way Paul talks here shows us that the display of wrath is a subordinate ends and the display of mercy is an ultimate end. This is further shown in how he uses the participle θέλων to speak about wrath and the ἵνα construction to speak about mercy. These both introduce purpose clauses but one is more direct and more clearly ultimate than the other. We would do well to learn from Paul’s example here! Application Questions 1) What is the connection between honor and glory? dishonor and wrath? I think Paul very clearly wants his readers, hearers, and opponents to see that he intends a connection between “vessels unto honor” and “vessels of mercy”, likewise intending a connection between “vessels unto dishonor” and “vessels of wrath”. If this connection is true then for the vessels of mercy, we are intended by the potter to display his glory in our humble dependence upon him for life and salvation. So then, let us worship with our faces to the dust as our brother Job, let us remember that we are but dust. It is not for us to dispute with the Maker, “why have you made me thusly?” We are vessels of mercy, worship God for his mercy! It’s what all vessels are made for, but not all will display it the same way. And we ought never consign others over to being vessels of wrath. I often hear this with regard to Muslims. “They are so evil and so anti-Christ that we shouldn’t even bother going to tell them the good news. Let them read it on the internet or something, they don’t deserve more than that!” Sadly I hear a similar presumption in this reasoning as I hear in Paul’s opponent, not his anguish of heart in 9:1-5. Being a vessel of mercy means that we ought also extend mercy, even to the point of our own death at the hands of other vessels. Willingness to be martyred for Christ is toll of mercy’s mighty bell. It resounds far longer than a voice and far clearer than a book. O God, bring us into accord with who the Gospel has called us to be, vessels of mercy for your praise and vessels of mercy for the sake of the nations, that they might taste this immeasurable mercy that we know in Christ! 2) How shall we then worship God in light of these truths? Paraphrase: Put your face back in the dust And know from whence you came Dare not call your God unjust But bow and bless his name For from all the ages past He is free, He is free To display his awesome wrath And his lavish mercy Grace That Never Fails By: Marcus Leman O wretched sinner come, come to the Lord your Judge; But come with joy if you do come in Jesus’ blood. His death has made a way that sin and death may die; Believe His promise, trust in Him, He does not lie. The Lord above is kind, His patience does abide, But when the judgment call goes out, who then may hide? God’s holy law remains; His righteousness is sure, Forbearance over sin abounds but won’t endure. O Christian take your peace, our great High Priest does see And stands before His Father’s throne to intercede. Another Comforter He sent to be our guide; His Spirit gives us victory o’er sin’s dark night. What grace that never fails, now pouring from above, Like rain from endless storehouses of steadfast love! It carries us along, though sin and foe assail, To meet with our Lord Jesus Christ beyond the veil. To the Tune: LEONI The Synagogue melody; arr. Meyer Lyon, c. 1770 notes
Arc
2010-10-23 10:19:43
2011-05-09 15:48:08
editing
Romans
Romans 9:19-23
NT
tisch
mine
Ἐρεῖς μοι οὖν, τί [οὖν] ἔτι μέμφεται;
Therefore you will say to me, "Why [then] does he still find fault?
τῷ γὰρ βουλήματι αὐτοῦ τίς ἀνθέστηκεν;
For who has resisted his will?"
ground
ὦ ἄνθρωπε, μενοῦνγε σὺ τίς εἶ ὁ ἀνταποκρινόμενος τῷ θεῷ;
O man, on the contrary, who are you (to be) the one answering back to God?
μὴ ἐρεῖ τὸ πλάσμα τῷ πλάσαντι, τί με ἐποίησας οὕτως;
(For) will the thing being formed say to the one forming it, "Why did you make me like this?"
ἢ οὐκ ἔχει ἐξουσίαν ὁ κεραμεὺς τοῦ πηλοῦ ἐκ τοῦ αὐτοῦ φυράματος ποιῆσαι ὃ μὲν εἰς τιμὴν σκεῦος, ὃ δὲ εἰς ἀτιμίαν;
Or does not the potter have authority over the clay from the same lump to make some a vessel which is unto honor and some (a vessel) which is unto dishonor?
alternative
questionanswer
εἰ δὲ ... ὁ θεὸς ... ἤνεγκεν ἐν πολλῇ μακροθυμίᾳ σκεύη ὀργῆς κατηρτισμένα εἰς ἀπώλειαν,
But (what) if God ... bore with much patience vessels of wrath being fit unto destruction,
θέλων ... ἐνδείξασθαι τὴν ὀργὴν
desiring to show wrath
καὶ γνωρίσαι τὸ δυνατὸν αὐτοῦ ...
and to make known his power ...
series
καὶ ἵνα γνωρίσῃ τὸν πλοῦτον τῆς δόξης αὐτοῦ ἐπὶ σκεύη ἐλέους,
and in order to make know the wealth of his glory upon vessels of mercy,
ἃ προητοίμασεν εἰς δόξαν;
which he prepared beforehand unto glory?
ideaexplanation
progression
actionpurpose
discourse
10000000054215 54215 Arc 2010-10-23 10:19:43 2011-05-09 15:48:08 editing Romans 9 19 9 23 Romans 9:19-23 45 NT tisch mine i388236 i388237 i388238 i388226 Ἐρεῖς μοι οὖν, τί [οὖν] ἔτι μέμφεται; Therefore you will say to me, "Why [then] does he still find fault? i388227 τῷ γὰρ βουλήματι αὐτοῦ τίς ἀνθέστηκεν; For who has resisted his will?" ground 1 i388239 i388228 ὦ ἄνθρωπε, μενοῦνγε σὺ τίς εἶ ὁ ἀνταποκρινόμενος τῷ θεῷ; O man, on the contrary, who are you (to be) the one answering back to God? i388240 i388229 μὴ ἐρεῖ τὸ πλάσμα τῷ πλάσαντι, τί με ἐποίησας οὕτως; (For) will the thing being formed say to the one forming it, "Why did you make me like this?" i388230 ἢ οὐκ ἔχει ἐξουσίαν ὁ κεραμεὺς τοῦ πηλοῦ ἐκ τοῦ αὐτοῦ φυράματος ποιῆσαι ὃ μὲν εἰς τιμὴν σκεῦος, ὃ δὲ εἰς ἀτιμίαν; Or does not the potter have authority over the clay from the same lump to make some a vessel which is unto honor and some (a vessel) which is unto dishonor? ground 1 alternative questionanswer 2 i388241 i388231 εἰ δὲ ... ὁ θεὸς ... ἤνεγκεν ἐν πολλῇ μακροθυμίᾳ σκεύη ὀργῆς κατηρτισμένα εἰς ἀπώλειαν, But (what) if God ... bore with much patience vessels of wrath being fit unto destruction, i388242 i388243 i388232 θέλων ... ἐνδείξασθαι τὴν ὀργὴν desiring to show wrath i388233 καὶ γνωρίσαι τὸ δυνατὸν αὐτοῦ ... and to make known his power ... series i388244 i388234 καὶ ἵνα γνωρίσῃ τὸν πλοῦτον τῆς δόξης αὐτοῦ ἐπὶ σκεύη ἐλέους, and in order to make know the wealth of his glory upon vessels of mercy, i388235 ἃ προητοίμασεν εἰς δόξαν; which he prepared beforehand unto glory? ideaexplanation 1 progression actionpurpose 2 1 1 1 tisch 25 mine 25 a 50 discourse
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Disclaimer: The opinions and conclusions expressed on this page are those of the author and may or may not accord with the positions of Biblearc or Bethlehem College & Seminary.