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For the earth will be filled with the knowledge of the glory of the LORD as the waters cover the sea
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Salvation through the Suffering Messiah
Matthew 16:21-23
Do you know that Jesus could not evade the cross?
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#SufferingMessiah
#theCross
Published April 26th, 2021; Updated April 26th, 2021
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Phrase
NT
Matthew 16:21-23
na28
Ἀπὸ τότε ἤρξατο ὁ Ἰησοῦς δεικνύειν τοῖς μαθηταῖς αὐτοῦ
Action
ὅτι δεῖ αὐτὸν εἰς Ἱεροσόλυμα ἀπελθεῖν
Content of 21a
καὶ πολλὰ παθεῖν
Result of 21b
ἀπὸ τῶν πρεσβυτέρων καὶ ἀρχιερέων καὶ γραμματέων
Means of 21c
καὶ ἀποκτανθῆναι καὶ τῇ τρίτῃ ἡμέρᾳ ἐγερθῆναι.
Result of 21c
καὶ προσλαβόμενος αὐτὸν
Manner of 22b
ὁ Πέτρος ἤρξατο ἐπιτιμᾶν αὐτῷ
λέγων• ἵλεώς σοι, κύριε• οὐ μὴ ἔσται σοι τοῦτο.
Objection to 21
ὁ δὲ στραφεὶς εἶπεν τῷ Πέτρῳ•
Response to 22
ὕπαγε ὀπίσω μου, σατανᾶ•
Command of 23a
σκάνδαλον εἶ ἐμοῦ,
Assertion of 23b
ὅτι οὐ φρονεῖς τὰ τοῦ θεοῦ
Reason of 23 b, c
ἀλλὰ τὰ τῶν ἀνθρώπων.
Contrast to 23d
Ἀπὸ τότε ἤρξατο ὁ Ἰησοῦς δεικνύειν τοῖς μαθηταῖς αὐτοῦ ὅτι δεῖ αὐτὸν εἰς Ἱεροσόλυμα ἀπελθεῖν καὶ πολλὰ παθεῖν ἀπὸ τῶν πρεσβυτέρων καὶ ἀρχιερέων καὶ γραμματέων καὶ ἀποκτανθῆναι καὶ τῇ τρίτῃ ἡμέρᾳ ἐγερθῆναι.
καὶ προσλαβόμενος αὐτὸν ὁ Πέτρος ἤρξατο ἐπιτιμᾶν αὐτῷ λέγων• ἵλεώς σοι, κύριε• οὐ μὴ ἔσται σοι τοῦτο.
ὁ δὲ στραφεὶς εἶπεν τῷ Πέτρῳ• ὕπαγε ὀπίσω μου, σατανᾶ• σκάνδαλον εἶ ἐμοῦ, ὅτι οὐ φρονεῖς τὰ τοῦ θεοῦ ἀλλὰ τὰ τῶν ἀνθρώπων.
phrasing
Devotional
Matthew 16:21-23 Devotional The pages of the New Testament presents a savior to us who was willing to suffer and die for us without compulsion or regret. He was willing to suffer because of his love and determination to free us from condemnation to the shackles of sin and death and to grant us eternal life with God as worthy sons. He did not allow anything to stand in the way of his salvific work. God had willed and ordained that it happen through suffering and Jesus will not have it any other way. The Conversation in Matthew 16:21-23 between Jesus and Peter is one of those instances in the New Testament wherein we see Jesus’ commitment to this salvific work through suffering. For the sake of context, we cannot fail to acknowledge that the opening phrase "from that time (NASB)" refers us back to the events of Matthew 16:13-20 . Wherein, Jesus asked to know whom the people and his disciples thought he was. Simon Peter acting as the spokesperson of the disciples identified Jesus, as "you are the Christ the son of the living God." ( Matt 16:16 ). This confession and Jesus’ acceptance of it made it clear to Jesus’ disciples that he was the long-awaited Jewish Messiah (Matt. 15:24; 16:17-20). Jesus proceeded to show his disciples that his salvation work must happen through suffering, death, and resurrection there was no other way (Matt. 16:21). This is not naturally what they will expect of the Messiah. Simon Peter’s response is proof of that (Matt. 16:22). He shows his indignation by rebuking Jesus. Nevertheless, Jesus’ reiterated his point because he saw that Peter's words were from myopia caused by Satan to prevent him from seeing the ultimate good in what Jesus said. If he only thought carefully about what Jesus had said he would have asked him what he meant by "be raised on the third day". Jesus rebuked Peter and emphasized the fact that the ways of God are different from those of men, which is the reason why Peter should not think of it as unacceptable for him to talk of suffering and death (Matt. 16:23). In addition, he is not the kind of savior that the world will normally expect because the kind of salvation he brings to those who put their trust in him is no ordinary salvation. As the suffering Messiah (Isa. 53), He came to pay the price for man’s sin through His death on the cross. Jesus had to die as the ultimate sacrifice by the hands of the Jews (Matt. 16:21) and God (Isa. 53:10). Only God could make a perfect sacrifice to a perfect God to save men from the wrath of a perfect God for eternity. Yes, the Jews had a secondary contribution to Jesus' death by causing him to suffer but only God could kill him (Isa. 53:10). We know from reading the rest of the book of Matthew that things panned out just as Jesus predicted. He was killed and raised on the third day according to the plan of God. Jesus paid the price on the cross. Now, everyone who believes in him does not have to die because they already benefitted from his death and resurrection and are therefore raised with him to an eternal life with God (Eph 2:6; Col. 3:1). The cross of Christ symbolized the pinnacle of suffering but he was willing to go to the cross for us, What a savior.
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Matthew 16:21-23
nasb
na28
a From that time 1 Jesus began to show His disciples
Ἀπὸ τότε ἤρξατο ὁ Ἰησοῦς δεικνύειν τοῖς μαθηταῖς αὐτοῦ
that it is necessary for him to go to Jerusalem,
ὅτι δεῖ αὐτὸν εἰς Ἱεροσόλυμα ἀπελθεῖν
and b suffer many things
καὶ πολλὰ παθεῖν
from the elders and chief priests and scribes,
ἀπὸ τῶν πρεσβυτέρων καὶ ἀρχιερέων καὶ γραμματέων
actionmanner
and to be killed,
καὶ ἀποκτανθῆναι
and to be raised up on the third day.
καὶ τῇ τρίτῃ ἡμέρᾳ ἐγερθῆναι.
progression
actionresult
ideaexplanation
Peter took Him aside
καὶ προσλαβόμενος αὐτὸν
and began to rebuke Him,
ὁ Πέτρος ἤρξατο ἐπιτιμᾶν αὐτῷ
saying, “ 1 God forbid it, Lord! This shall never 2 happen to You.”
λέγων• ἵλεώς σοι, κύριε• οὐ μὴ ἔσται σοι τοῦτο.
But He turned and said to Peter,
ὁ δὲ στραφεὶς εἶπεν τῷ Πέτρῳ•
“Get behind Me, a Satan!
ὕπαγε ὀπίσω μου, σατανᾶ•
You are a stumbling block to Me;
σκάνδαλον εἶ ἐμοῦ,
for you are not setting your mind on 1 God’s interests,
ὅτι οὐ φρονεῖς τὰ τοῦ θεοῦ
but man’s.”
ἀλλὰ τὰ τῶν ἀνθρώπων.
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Matthew 16:21-23
na28
subjectverb
Ἰησοῦς
solid
drop
equal
revrocket
line
pred
ἤρξατο
dblaccusative
δεικνύειν
prepphrase
pstack
cword
τοῖς
μαθηταῖς
αὐτοῦ
directobject
shelf
vertical
δεῖ
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ἀπελθεῖν
παθεῖν
αὐτὸν
εἰς
Ἱεροσόλυμα
ἀπὸ
τῶν
πρεσβυτέρων
γραμματέων
ἀρχιερέων
καὶ
καὶ
πολλὰ
ἀποκτανθῆναι
ἐγερθῆναι
τῇ
ἡμέρᾳ
τρίτῃ
καὶ
καὶ
καὶ
ὅτι
text
Ἀπὸ
τότε
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Matthew 16:21
Matthew 16:22
Πέτρος
ἤρξατο
participle
προσλαβόμενος
αὐτὸν
infinitive
ἐπιτιμᾶν
αὐτῷ
λέγων
κύριε
οὐ
μὴ
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ἵλεώς
σοι
ἔσται
predicate
τοῦτο
σοι
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Matthew 16:23
δὲ
στραφεὶς
εἶπεν
τῷ
Πέτρῳ
ὕπαγε
ὀπίσω
μου
σατανᾶ
εἶ
σκάνδαλον
ἐμοῦ
φρονεῖς
οὐ
τὰ
τοῦ
θεοῦ
(φρονεῖς)
τὰ
τῶν
ἀνθρώπων
ἀλλὰ
ὅτι
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Commentary Note
Commentary Notes The Gospel of Matthew: A Commentary on the Greek Text The Movement of Matthew's story now turns towards Jerusalem. Until Jesus enters Jerusalem in 21:11, each of the sections will now begin with some statement that reminds the reader that Jesus' goal is to be in Jerusalem ( 16:21 ; 17:22 ; 19:1 ; 20:17 ). [1] In Matthew 16:21, from that time began’ was used at 4:17 to mark the transition from the ministry of John the Baptist to that of Jesus. Now it is used to mark the transition from a period of ministry that has reached culmination in Peter’s confession that Jesus is the Christ, the son of the living God, to a period in which orientation towards a fate of suffering for Jesus in Jerusalem comes into sharp focus: Jesus’ place in the kingdom of God he preached is as the Christ pf the Davidic line. but it will be so as one for whom suffering precedes vindication. [2] The Expositor’s Bible Commentary 1. Hypage opisō mou , Satana (lit., “Go behind me, Satan”) could, by itself, be a call to discipleship (cf. the same adverb in Mark 1:17 , 20 ; 8:34 ) and therefore be a sharp reminder for Peter to remember that as a disciple he must follow, not lead. But this ill suits the vocative “Satan.” The verb hypagō is therefore best taken in the way it is used in Matthew 4:10 (“Away from me, Satan”). It is not simply that Peter should get out of Jesus’ sight (so NIV) but, as a stumbling block, out of Jesus’ way. 2. A few moments earlier Jesus had called Peter a rock. Now he calls him a different kind of “rock,” a skandalon (“a stumbling block”; see on 5:29). This is one of several striking parallels between 16:13–20 and vv. 21–23 [1] . [1] D. A. Carson, “Matthew,” in The Expositor’s Bible Commentary: Matthew, Mark, Luke , ed. Frank E. Gaebelein, vol. 8 (Grand Rapids: Zondervan Publishing House, 1984), 377. [1] John Nolland, The Gospel of Matthew: A Commentary on the Greek Text , The NIGTC (Grand Rapids: Bletchley: W.B. Eerdmans Pub. Co ; Paternoster Press, 2005), 685. [2] Ibid, 685
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