Author
Steven Long
Broken and healed; sinful and forgiven. His mercies are new every morning!
User since 2009
Steven's published pages
Even in the prophets, we see the gospel clearly proclaimed. Take heart and know that even long ago God planned to save a people unto Himself
Hosea 2:16-20
Idolatry is an act of unfaithfulness to Yahweh. His purpose of His people is that they know Him in an intimate way, forsaking all others.
Hosea 2:16-20
Do not be discouraged when you sin. God's promise to be with His people is not hindered by your sin, as we learn from Jacob
Genesis 28:10-15
God's promise to keep you secure lies not in your ability to perform or not perform, but in His good word
Genesis 28:10-15
Jesus' incarnation was not simply to come as God in the flesh. It was to fulfill the atonement for His people and be crushed by God.
Isaiah 53:1-6
Worry & Anxiousness are the beginning signs of idolatry, even worry over our basic needs. Do you worry?
Matthew 6:25-34
Even our basic needs are no cause for anxiety. Jesus assures us that the Father will provide for His children from day to day
Matthew 6:25-34
What does believing and doubting have to do with prayer and receiving from God? EVERYTHING!
James 1:2-8
The believer's certainty is so sure that John stated it twice. God's love for His people is remarkable!
John 3:9-18
Humility is submitting to God, both in trials and in the Church
1 Peter 5:6-9
Paul's success in the gospel was due largely to the people's help. Do you stand behind those who minister to you?
Philippians 1:3-11
The resurrection gives a believer hope because he will be kept by a power greater than himself–God's own power.
1Peter 1:3-5
We receive everything of God "according to His great mercy." Everything hinges on this
1Peter 1:3-5
How do we fear God and love Him at the same time? The Psalmist has the answer
Psalms 147:10-11
Our salvation is the most precious thing we have. The prophets, apostles, and Holy Spirit all testify to it
1 Peter 1:10-12
The Incarnation of Christ is about more than just a manger. He is manifested for the joy of the world
1 John 1:1-5
Chaos is not always bad. God commands that we fully lean on Him. Israel's wanderings are a great example of good chaos.
Deuteronomy 8:1-5
A person who fancies their self religious but has no outward manifestation is one who is most deceived indeed.
James 1:26-27
Trials are only here for a little while; and then we are with Jesus. What a great comfort this should be to Christians!
1 Peter 1:1-9
God's holiness is fearful; His mercy is greater
Isaiah 6:1-7
Forget your checklist. Stop looking inside to find your justification and look to the cross for a clean conscience.
Galatians 3:1-7
God is the ultimate Blesser. We should focus less on our blessings and focus more on the Blesser Himself.
Ephesians 1:1-14
The goodness of God leads us to great philanthropic acts (good works) because He saved us from a life of sinful desires and attitudes.
Titus 3:1-8
Do you like stirring up trouble? Are you a person who likes to argue just for argument's sake? If so you may be in danger!
Titus 3:9-11
If you believe good works has nothing to do with Christianity, think again. Good works doesn't sanctify us but it proves our fruit.
Titus 3:12-15
Phrase.
Titus 3:1-8
Main point summary. Arc.
Ephesians 1:1-14
Arc.
Galatians 1:1-5
Arc.
1 Corinthians 2:6-9
It appears that the two main themes that flow out of this passage are: To His glorious praise.
Ephesians 1:3-9
  .
Ephesians 1:3-10
Inheritors of the Crown   Again, the glory of God and Christ are the central theme in this pass...
Ephesians 1:11-14
  Note on 1c - One may ask why I consider 1c a concessive statement.
1 Peter 1:1-5
A Brief Synopsis 7a seems to be the ground for these four verses.
1 Peter 1:6-9
view all (35 total)
City of God
Hebrews 11:8-19
Context This section of Hebrews 11 deals specifically with the faith of Abraham.
Published June 1st, 2012
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This page was automatically converted from a module that was shared prior to the release of Published Pages. Additionally, the arc below was auto-converted from the arc created by the author (which used the old module), and so it is possible there are misplaced logical relationships.
notes 1452680586940 Disclaimer This page was automatically converted from a module that was shared prior to the release of Published Pages. Additionally, the arc below was auto-converted from the arc created by the author (which used the old module), and so it is possible there are misplaced logical relationships.
Notes
2010-07-07 20:47:55
2012-09-15 15:58:42
Context This section of Hebrews 11 deals specifically with the faith of Abraham. Recounting all the heros of old, the writer encourages the Jewish believers being tempted to return to the "old" way of worship to remain steadfast by using these examples of those who persevered and overcame. After recounting the acts of Able and Noah he moves on to the most famous of patriarchs, Abraham, the father of [spiritual] faith. The example of Abraham covers more verses in the Hall of Faith than any of the other characters. And this is indeed fitting as these believers would no doubt know the story very well themselves, but be convinced that Abraham's life reflected their own in a sense. Exposition This passage can be divided nicely into three sub-sections: 1. Abraham's call and response (vv.8-10, 17-19) 2. Sarah's confidence and conception (vv.11-12), 3. God's admiration and reward (vv.13-16). I view verses 13-16 as the main theme of the author in this particular passage. A. Abraham's Call & Obedience Abraham's call came in three stages: First, He was called. We are not told the circumstances surrounding his calling in Genesis other than the fact that God did call him. Josephus gives us a bit of insight into his calling from his work Antiquities: Now Abram, having no son of his own, adopted Lot, his brother Haran's son, and his wife Sarai's brother; and he left the land of Chaldea when he was seventy-five years old, and at the command of God went into Canaan, and therein he dwelt himself, and left it to his posterity. He was a person of great sagacity, both for understanding all things and persuading his hearers, and not mistaken in his opinions; for which reason he began to have higher notions of virtue than others had, and he determined to renew and to change the opinion all men happened then to have concerning God; for he was the first that ventured to publish this notion, That there was but one God, the Creator of the universe; and that, as to other [gods], if they contributed any thing to the happiness of men, that each of them afforded it only according to his appointment, and not by their own power. This his opinion was derived from the irregular phenomena that were visible both at land and sea , as well as those that happen to the sun , and moon, and all the heavenly bodies, thus: - "If [said he] these bodies had power of their own, they would certainly take care of their own regular motions; but since they do not preserve such regularity, they make it plain, that in so far as they co-operate to our advantage, they do it not of their own abilities, but as they are subservient to Him that commands them, to whom alone we ought justly to offer our honor and thanksgiving." For which doctrines, when the Chaldeans, and other people of Mesopotamia, raised a tumult against him, he thought fit to leave that country; and at the command and by the assistance of God, he came and lived in the land of Canaan. And when he was there settled, he built an altar, and performed a sacrifice to God. This calling marked the beginning of a nation and the the reality of the fact that God wanted for Himself, a people to be called after His own Name. (Josephus, Antiquites 1:7:1) It is important to realize, though, that God did not call Abraham because of his own righteousness or virtue. We are plainly told elswhere in Scripture that the natural (unregenerated) man is at enmity with God (Ro 8:6-8) and there is no reason to think that Abraham, being 75 when he left the land was not somehow involved in idol worship until God began to stir in his heart the reality that He alone was the true God who made everything that he saw: stars, planets, earth, and sky. And when God had completed Abraham's yearning for that which was a better city (v.10) , He then called him to leave and so thus began to set apart a people to Himself. Second, he obeyed. Note that Abraham did not know where he was going. Much like the first disciples Jesus called who receieved no more information than, "Follow Me," so Abraham had no idea where he was going. It is no surprise then that the author uses this very same word in 5:9 to describe those who inherit salvation by 'obeying' Him. The magnitude of Abraham's obedience implies (1) a complete trust. It is not a trust in that all things will "work out" but rather a quiet confidence in the One who has called us. The One who calls has already ordained our steps and has determined the Good Land that He will bring us to. The way is not promised easy or smooth, only that it leads to rest in the end. This is what Abraham saw through the eyes of faith and it is why he could leave his entire family and kin to follow God when he was called. (2) It implies a complete forsaking of comon sense. One must wonder if Abraham was scolded for not "using his head" when ventuing out of his country. For most people, leaving the comfort zone of friends and family at hearing a specific calling is considered foolish. But It was not "common sense" in the fact that he abandoned all his intellect and good sense. Certainly we have been endowed with logic and persuasion and seen the examples of logical thinking throughout all the New Testament. For example, Paul's argument to the Corinthians that joining themselves with a prostitute was in essence subjecting Christ to the same thing because they were members of the body of Christ. In light of this he tells them to flee sexual immorality (1Cor 6:12-20). So this obedience was not an abandoment of all logical things that Abraham knew. Rather, it was an abandomnent in the reality of God's promise. And this promise could only have been seen through the eyes of faith. Third, he went. He went to live in a land where he knew and understood that he would be treated like a foreigner. This is an interesting fact considering that God had promised that he would be the inheritor of the land. Abraham showed his humility by "living in tents" rather than settling down permanently. And we are told the reason in verse 10 that he was looking for a better city; one that he would dwell in permanently with God Himself. His expectation then, seemed to be relational rather than material. The same humility is exercised by our Lord in that He came unto His own and His own received Him not. He humbled Himself unto death, even death on a cross (Joh 1:12, Php 2:10). And after he lived in tents for some time the promised heir, Isaac, was born. Abraham then faced the greatest of all challenges: obedience to slaughter his son, the promised heir! At this point Abraham's trust in God is further expounded upon. He considered God's power to raise the dead. Vines gives a bit of insight into this word logizomai (reason, consider): availing for or equivalent to something, as having the like force and weight In other words, Abraham considered God's power of rasing Isaac from the dead as being the same force of his sacrificing his son. To put in more simpe terms, Abraham was convinced that because God had promised him this heir that He would go as far as rasing Isaac from the dead in order to honor His Word to him. That is complete trust! B. Sarah's Confidence and Conception The writer moves on to Sarah explaining that she received power to conceive a son. Genesis tells us that when this occurred she was well past the age of child bearing. But more importantly we are told that the reason is that she considered God faithful of the promise spoken to her husband. While the Genesis account only tells us that she laughed at the thought of having a child there is no reason to believe that he faith was not just as strong, simply because the assurance rested not soley in her but in the promised word of God. As a result, she received what she had longed for all her life. Verse 13 gives us the result of that confidence, summing it up as the fulfillment of the promise of many sons & daughters. C. God's Admiration and Reward These verses comprise (of what I believe) to be the entire crux of the passage. The author's main piont is not so much in how they lived as in how they died: in faith. He tells us three things about their death: They died without receiving the promise (vv.13-14). From Able to Jacob, death occurred without the full promise coming to fruation. They continued to persevere despite not receiving fully what God had promised them. And why did they continue to persevere? Because they saw them from afar (the promises) and greeted them. In other words, it seems that they were aware of the future promise rather than the immediate promise. Verse 14 makes this clear when it states for people who speak thus. The Greek word λέγω appears in this passage as a present participle, literally reading "those who are speaking like these [things]." The author is perhaps telling his audience that even now these great men and women of faith still speak, only now from the view of the fulfillment of the promise. They exiled themselves by choice (v.15). Their minds were set on receiving the proimse of God and it is clear that they did not desire to go back from where they left. Surely, that is not to say that the way was not hard, nor did they not dream and long for familarity just as we do during a season of hardships. We whine and mull over the "good old days" when our friends adored us for our wickedness but now despise for our righteousness. So too, these men had hardships and enemies. But we are clearly told that had they really wanted to go back they had the opportunity to do so. They could have returned and picked up life where they had left off. And no doubt they may have even been welcome. But they were aware that friendship with the world was enmity towards God (Jas 4:4). Therefore, they desired God's city more than their own; they craved God's friendship over temporal relationships; and they looked not back to their own countries that they might be counted as heirs to the new one. They inherited the city of God (v.16). Finally, we see the outcome of their faith. The culmination of this passage reaches its pinnacle here when the Jewish believers of whom this letter is addressed are plainly told that God identifies Himself as their God. No doubt he is referencing several Old Testament passages to stir up their hearts (Jer 24, Ezek 11, 14, 37 to name a few). The Jews, more than anything desired to be God's special people. They longed for YWH to redeem them and bring them into the full inheritance promised of the Patriarchs long ago. But the desire of Abraham and his heirs was to live in the presence of God (cf, Heb 11:10) and to live in the country and city of God. This is the intention of the author to show that their faith produced, not the temporal inheritance but the enternal reward. That is what the author intends to show his audience. It is not for them to return to their own "countries" (the former way of worship. cf, Heb 6:1-12). And so, in the same way, God prepares a city for all those who desire a place whose foundations are built by God. The Application What then is our response to the calling of this inhertiance? First, we must be sworn to leave our own countries. It is not enough to say "I will follow Jesus wherever He leads me!" We must completely abandon that which is dearest to us; that which is most familiar and sacred. Sacrifice our Isaacs if we must, but let not country or kin interfere with our abandoment to God. We all hold certain things in endearment and what I hold to be dearest to me may not be an issue for you. Therefore, fast and pray and seek diligently God's searching in your hearts. And know this: He will show you your Isaac and then you will come to the same point as Abraham. But will you (or I) logizomai (consider) that God will bring our Isaacs back from the dead? And even if He chooses to leave them on the altar, or if He so chooses to burn them to ash, will we still consider Him faithful and pursue, not our desires for the resurrection of our beloved, but for the privilige of being in His presence forever? Second, we must expect to be treated as foreigners to the world. The first point will do no good if we are not aware of the world's reaction to this radical kind of living. We will be mocked and told we are senseless for abandoning these fleeting pleasures in order to pursue that which cannot be seen. But we are fools for Christ's sake (1Cor 4:10) and the world cannot help but call us fools until it receieves the eyes of faith. For while they look for mansions and jewels, we seek, not the Heavenly City itself, but the One who is building it. For we delight in Him for [He] has made known to [us] the path of life; in [His] presence there is fullness of joy; at [His] right hand are pleasures forevermore (Ps 16:11). Our fulfillment comes not from man but from God; our joy springs forth not from wishful thinking but the expectation of sure deliverance; and our future is secured not of earthly sustenance but of Heavenly manna. Let us pursue our Heavenly calling with the diligence and perseverence of Abraham. God bless you.
10000000043291 43291 Notes 2010-07-07 20:47:55 2012-09-15 15:58:42 Context This section of Hebrews 11 deals specifically with the faith of Abraham. Recounting all the heros of old, the writer encourages the Jewish believers being tempted to return to the "old" way of worship to remain steadfast by using these examples of those who persevered and overcame. After recounting the acts of Able and Noah he moves on to the most famous of patriarchs, Abraham, the father of [spiritual] faith. The example of Abraham covers more verses in the Hall of Faith than any of the other characters. And this is indeed fitting as these believers would no doubt know the story very well themselves, but be convinced that Abraham's life reflected their own in a sense. Exposition This passage can be divided nicely into three sub-sections: 1. Abraham's call and response (vv.8-10, 17-19) 2. Sarah's confidence and conception (vv.11-12), 3. God's admiration and reward (vv.13-16). I view verses 13-16 as the main theme of the author in this particular passage. A. Abraham's Call & Obedience Abraham's call came in three stages: First, He was called. We are not told the circumstances surrounding his calling in Genesis other than the fact that God did call him. Josephus gives us a bit of insight into his calling from his work Antiquities: Now Abram, having no son of his own, adopted Lot, his brother Haran's son, and his wife Sarai's brother; and he left the land of Chaldea when he was seventy-five years old, and at the command of God went into Canaan, and therein he dwelt himself, and left it to his posterity. He was a person of great sagacity, both for understanding all things and persuading his hearers, and not mistaken in his opinions; for which reason he began to have higher notions of virtue than others had, and he determined to renew and to change the opinion all men happened then to have concerning God; for he was the first that ventured to publish this notion, That there was but one God, the Creator of the universe; and that, as to other [gods], if they contributed any thing to the happiness of men, that each of them afforded it only according to his appointment, and not by their own power. This his opinion was derived from the irregular phenomena that were visible both at land and sea , as well as those that happen to the sun , and moon, and all the heavenly bodies, thus: - "If [said he] these bodies had power of their own, they would certainly take care of their own regular motions; but since they do not preserve such regularity, they make it plain, that in so far as they co-operate to our advantage, they do it not of their own abilities, but as they are subservient to Him that commands them, to whom alone we ought justly to offer our honor and thanksgiving." For which doctrines, when the Chaldeans, and other people of Mesopotamia, raised a tumult against him, he thought fit to leave that country; and at the command and by the assistance of God, he came and lived in the land of Canaan. And when he was there settled, he built an altar, and performed a sacrifice to God. This calling marked the beginning of a nation and the the reality of the fact that God wanted for Himself, a people to be called after His own Name. (Josephus, Antiquites 1:7:1) It is important to realize, though, that God did not call Abraham because of his own righteousness or virtue. We are plainly told elswhere in Scripture that the natural (unregenerated) man is at enmity with God (Ro 8:6-8) and there is no reason to think that Abraham, being 75 when he left the land was not somehow involved in idol worship until God began to stir in his heart the reality that He alone was the true God who made everything that he saw: stars, planets, earth, and sky. And when God had completed Abraham's yearning for that which was a better city (v.10) , He then called him to leave and so thus began to set apart a people to Himself. Second, he obeyed. Note that Abraham did not know where he was going. Much like the first disciples Jesus called who receieved no more information than, "Follow Me," so Abraham had no idea where he was going. It is no surprise then that the author uses this very same word in 5:9 to describe those who inherit salvation by 'obeying' Him. The magnitude of Abraham's obedience implies (1) a complete trust. It is not a trust in that all things will "work out" but rather a quiet confidence in the One who has called us. The One who calls has already ordained our steps and has determined the Good Land that He will bring us to. The way is not promised easy or smooth, only that it leads to rest in the end. This is what Abraham saw through the eyes of faith and it is why he could leave his entire family and kin to follow God when he was called. (2) It implies a complete forsaking of comon sense. One must wonder if Abraham was scolded for not "using his head" when ventuing out of his country. For most people, leaving the comfort zone of friends and family at hearing a specific calling is considered foolish. But It was not "common sense" in the fact that he abandoned all his intellect and good sense. Certainly we have been endowed with logic and persuasion and seen the examples of logical thinking throughout all the New Testament. For example, Paul's argument to the Corinthians that joining themselves with a prostitute was in essence subjecting Christ to the same thing because they were members of the body of Christ. In light of this he tells them to flee sexual immorality (1Cor 6:12-20). So this obedience was not an abandoment of all logical things that Abraham knew. Rather, it was an abandomnent in the reality of God's promise. And this promise could only have been seen through the eyes of faith. Third, he went. He went to live in a land where he knew and understood that he would be treated like a foreigner. This is an interesting fact considering that God had promised that he would be the inheritor of the land. Abraham showed his humility by "living in tents" rather than settling down permanently. And we are told the reason in verse 10 that he was looking for a better city; one that he would dwell in permanently with God Himself. His expectation then, seemed to be relational rather than material. The same humility is exercised by our Lord in that He came unto His own and His own received Him not. He humbled Himself unto death, even death on a cross (Joh 1:12, Php 2:10). And after he lived in tents for some time the promised heir, Isaac, was born. Abraham then faced the greatest of all challenges: obedience to slaughter his son, the promised heir! At this point Abraham's trust in God is further expounded upon. He considered God's power to raise the dead. Vines gives a bit of insight into this word logizomai (reason, consider): availing for or equivalent to something, as having the like force and weight In other words, Abraham considered God's power of rasing Isaac from the dead as being the same force of his sacrificing his son. To put in more simpe terms, Abraham was convinced that because God had promised him this heir that He would go as far as rasing Isaac from the dead in order to honor His Word to him. That is complete trust! B. Sarah's Confidence and Conception The writer moves on to Sarah explaining that she received power to conceive a son. Genesis tells us that when this occurred she was well past the age of child bearing. But more importantly we are told that the reason is that she considered God faithful of the promise spoken to her husband. While the Genesis account only tells us that she laughed at the thought of having a child there is no reason to believe that he faith was not just as strong, simply because the assurance rested not soley in her but in the promised word of God. As a result, she received what she had longed for all her life. Verse 13 gives us the result of that confidence, summing it up as the fulfillment of the promise of many sons & daughters. C. God's Admiration and Reward These verses comprise (of what I believe) to be the entire crux of the passage. The author's main piont is not so much in how they lived as in how they died: in faith. He tells us three things about their death: They died without receiving the promise (vv.13-14). From Able to Jacob, death occurred without the full promise coming to fruation. They continued to persevere despite not receiving fully what God had promised them. And why did they continue to persevere? Because they saw them from afar (the promises) and greeted them. In other words, it seems that they were aware of the future promise rather than the immediate promise. Verse 14 makes this clear when it states for people who speak thus. The Greek word λέγω appears in this passage as a present participle, literally reading "those who are speaking like these [things]." The author is perhaps telling his audience that even now these great men and women of faith still speak, only now from the view of the fulfillment of the promise. They exiled themselves by choice (v.15). Their minds were set on receiving the proimse of God and it is clear that they did not desire to go back from where they left. Surely, that is not to say that the way was not hard, nor did they not dream and long for familarity just as we do during a season of hardships. We whine and mull over the "good old days" when our friends adored us for our wickedness but now despise for our righteousness. So too, these men had hardships and enemies. But we are clearly told that had they really wanted to go back they had the opportunity to do so. They could have returned and picked up life where they had left off. And no doubt they may have even been welcome. But they were aware that friendship with the world was enmity towards God (Jas 4:4). Therefore, they desired God's city more than their own; they craved God's friendship over temporal relationships; and they looked not back to their own countries that they might be counted as heirs to the new one. They inherited the city of God (v.16). Finally, we see the outcome of their faith. The culmination of this passage reaches its pinnacle here when the Jewish believers of whom this letter is addressed are plainly told that God identifies Himself as their God. No doubt he is referencing several Old Testament passages to stir up their hearts (Jer 24, Ezek 11, 14, 37 to name a few). The Jews, more than anything desired to be God's special people. They longed for YWH to redeem them and bring them into the full inheritance promised of the Patriarchs long ago. But the desire of Abraham and his heirs was to live in the presence of God (cf, Heb 11:10) and to live in the country and city of God. This is the intention of the author to show that their faith produced, not the temporal inheritance but the enternal reward. That is what the author intends to show his audience. It is not for them to return to their own "countries" (the former way of worship. cf, Heb 6:1-12). And so, in the same way, God prepares a city for all those who desire a place whose foundations are built by God. The Application What then is our response to the calling of this inhertiance? First, we must be sworn to leave our own countries. It is not enough to say "I will follow Jesus wherever He leads me!" We must completely abandon that which is dearest to us; that which is most familiar and sacred. Sacrifice our Isaacs if we must, but let not country or kin interfere with our abandoment to God. We all hold certain things in endearment and what I hold to be dearest to me may not be an issue for you. Therefore, fast and pray and seek diligently God's searching in your hearts. And know this: He will show you your Isaac and then you will come to the same point as Abraham. But will you (or I) logizomai (consider) that God will bring our Isaacs back from the dead? And even if He chooses to leave them on the altar, or if He so chooses to burn them to ash, will we still consider Him faithful and pursue, not our desires for the resurrection of our beloved, but for the privilige of being in His presence forever? Second, we must expect to be treated as foreigners to the world. The first point will do no good if we are not aware of the world's reaction to this radical kind of living. We will be mocked and told we are senseless for abandoning these fleeting pleasures in order to pursue that which cannot be seen. But we are fools for Christ's sake (1Cor 4:10) and the world cannot help but call us fools until it receieves the eyes of faith. For while they look for mansions and jewels, we seek, not the Heavenly City itself, but the One who is building it. For we delight in Him for [He] has made known to [us] the path of life; in [His] presence there is fullness of joy; at [His] right hand are pleasures forevermore (Ps 16:11). Our fulfillment comes not from man but from God; our joy springs forth not from wishful thinking but the expectation of sure deliverance; and our future is secured not of earthly sustenance but of Heavenly manna. Let us pursue our Heavenly calling with the diligence and perseverence of Abraham. God bless you. notes
Arc
2010-07-07 20:47:55
2015-05-31 21:32:13
editing
Hebrews
Hebrews 11:8-19
NT
esv
By fait h Abraham obeyed when he was called to go out to a place that he was to receive as an inheritance.
And he went out,
not knowing where he was going.
By faith he went to live in the land of promise , as in a foreign land,
living in tents with Isaac and Jacob,
heirs with him of the same promise.
For he was looking forward to the city that has foundations, whose designer and builder is God. {cf, v.16}
concessive
By faith Sarah herself received power to conceive, even when she was past the age,
since she considered him faithful who had promised.
ideaexplanation
Therefore from one man,
and him as good as dead,
were born descendants as many as the stars of heaven
inference
and as many as the innumerable grains of sand by the seashore.
These all died in faith ,
not having received the things promised,
but having seen them [through the eyes of faith] and greeted them from afar,
and having acknowledged that they were strangers and exiles on the earth.
actionmanner
For people who speak thus make it clear that they are seeking a homeland .
If they had been thinking of that land from which they had gone out,
they would have had opportunity to return.
conditional
But as it is, they desire a better country,
that is, a heavenly one.
Therefore God is not ashamed to be called their God,
for he has prepared for them a city. {The very city Abraham is looking for}
actionresult
By faith Abraham, when he was tested,
offered up Isaac,
situationresponse
and he who had received the promises
was in the act of offering up his only son,
of whom it was said, "Through Isaac shall your offspring be named."
He considered that God was able even to raise him from the dead,
from which, figuratively speaking, he did receive him back.
ground
discourse
10000000043291 43291 Arc 2010-07-07 20:47:55 2015-05-31 21:32:13 editing Hebrews 11 8 11 19 Hebrews 11:8-19 58 NT esv i329133 i329134 i329135 i329102 By fait h Abraham obeyed when he was called to go out to a place that he was to receive as an inheritance. i329103 And he went out, i329104 not knowing where he was going. i329136 i329105 By faith he went to live in the land of promise , as in a foreign land, i329137 i329106 living in tents with Isaac and Jacob, i329107 heirs with him of the same promise. i329108 For he was looking forward to the city that has foundations, whose designer and builder is God. {cf, v.16} concessive 2 i329138 i329139 i329109 By faith Sarah herself received power to conceive, even when she was past the age, i329110 since she considered him faithful who had promised. ideaexplanation 1 i329140 i329141 i329111 Therefore from one man, i329142 i329112 and him as good as dead, i329113 were born descendants as many as the stars of heaven inference 2 i329114 and as many as the innumerable grains of sand by the seashore. ideaexplanation 1 i329143 i329144 i329145 i329115 These all died in faith , i329116 not having received the things promised, ideaexplanation 1 i329146 i329117 but having seen them [through the eyes of faith] and greeted them from afar, i329118 and having acknowledged that they were strangers and exiles on the earth. actionmanner 1 1 concessive 2 i329147 i329119 For people who speak thus make it clear that they are seeking a homeland . i329148 i329120 If they had been thinking of that land from which they had gone out, i329121 they would have had opportunity to return. conditional 2 i329149 i329122 But as it is, they desire a better country, i329150 i329151 i329123 that is, a heavenly one. i329124 Therefore God is not ashamed to be called their God, i329125 for he has prepared for them a city. {The very city Abraham is looking for} actionresult 2 ideaexplanation 1 i329152 i329153 i329126 By faith Abraham, when he was tested, i329127 offered up Isaac, situationresponse 2 i329154 i329155 i329128 and he who had received the promises i329129 was in the act of offering up his only son, actionmanner 1 i329156 i329130 of whom it was said, "Through Isaac shall your offspring be named." i329157 i329131 He considered that God was able even to raise him from the dead, i329132 from which, figuratively speaking, he did receive him back. ideaexplanation 1 concessive 2 ground 1 1 1 1 esv 25 a 50 discourse
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