Jesus - foundation for change
1 Corinthians 5:6-8
This text is about the change that's necessary in the Corinthian community and giving a reason for why it is necessary.
Published June 1st, 2012
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This page was automatically converted from a module that was shared prior to the release of Published Pages. Additionally, the arc below was auto-converted from the arc created by the author (which used the old module), and so it is possible there are misplaced logical relationships.
notes 1452680588038 Disclaimer This page was automatically converted from a module that was shared prior to the release of Published Pages. Additionally, the arc below was auto-converted from the arc created by the author (which used the old module), and so it is possible there are misplaced logical relationships.
Notes
2011-02-25 03:24:33
2011-02-27 08:48:29
This text is about the change that's necessary in the Corinthian community and giving a reason for why it is necessary. The Corinthians were boasting, but Paul brings them back to reality and brings to them the picture of the leavened lump. From there he goes on to explain two things: 1. It is necessary to put away the old in order that they may be new. Now the interesting thing is, that I believe Paul gives them as a ground for that the fact that they are already new. He wants them to become what they already are. A mind boggling paradox, but not uncommon in scripture. It is solved by seeing that he wants them to become something in one area, which is already true of them in another area. They are objectively justified before God in a legal sense without being just in their living especially concerning the people that attend their church. That should lead to them becoming more and more just in their living, so that they might become, what they already are. I think that's what Romans 6 and other passages by Paul are adressing in more detail. In this passage, however it might well be that the main point is not so much the individual Christian living, but the church as a community of the redemmed putting away from them those, who do not submit themselves to God. 2. To celebrate the new passover. Here he gives a negative and a positive statement to explain how to celebrate it, namely NOT with malice and evil (old leaven), BUT with sincerity and truth (unleavened bread). From the bigger context I think it becomes clear, that the old leaven also refers to those, who ought to be excluded from the church community as the last step of church discipline, which means that malice and evil are intimately connected with those, that are attending church, but living an immoral life. For both of these exhortations there is one foundation, namely Christ having been sacrificed for us, as our passover lamb. That shouldn't be much of a surprise for a Christian, but for me it is really encouraging to see how Christ-centered the Bible really is and that it is not man with lofty ideas, who created some strange cult around Jesus. He really is the foundation in every part of our lives. Our celebration of that must be as God commands. The perfect lamb has been provided. Now there's the unleavened bread, that's necessary also. God has provided that one, too (7c says that they really are unleavened), but we have to keep the lump unleavened. The church must stay clean. I was wondering whether verse 7d is the ground for 7a-c and all of verse 8 an inference from the whole of verse 7, but decided to put 7d in the middle as a supporting statement for what comes above and below. My main reason for that is, that I don't see verses 7a-c (put away the old, get the new) being much of a reason for verse 8 (THEREFORE don't celebrate with the old, but with the new). Rather vese 7a-c and 8a-c are both exhortations founded on 7d. I'm not really satisfied with the two biggest arcs 6a-b = Ground and 7-8 = Inference. My thinking went like this: Paul introduces a new picture and he explains to them, what this picture is about. (Idea - Explanation) But he also tells them that the present situation is not good and because of that, they have to do some changes (Ground - Inference). I decided to take the second relationship because verses 7-8 are all about how they should change the bad present situation instead of boasting. Maybe it could be even a +/- relationship, but I'm not sure about that and any help is greatly appreciated.
10000000069566 69566 Notes 2011-02-25 03:24:33 2011-02-27 08:48:29 This text is about the change that's necessary in the Corinthian community and giving a reason for why it is necessary. The Corinthians were boasting, but Paul brings them back to reality and brings to them the picture of the leavened lump. From there he goes on to explain two things: 1. It is necessary to put away the old in order that they may be new. Now the interesting thing is, that I believe Paul gives them as a ground for that the fact that they are already new. He wants them to become what they already are. A mind boggling paradox, but not uncommon in scripture. It is solved by seeing that he wants them to become something in one area, which is already true of them in another area. They are objectively justified before God in a legal sense without being just in their living especially concerning the people that attend their church. That should lead to them becoming more and more just in their living, so that they might become, what they already are. I think that's what Romans 6 and other passages by Paul are adressing in more detail. In this passage, however it might well be that the main point is not so much the individual Christian living, but the church as a community of the redemmed putting away from them those, who do not submit themselves to God. 2. To celebrate the new passover. Here he gives a negative and a positive statement to explain how to celebrate it, namely NOT with malice and evil (old leaven), BUT with sincerity and truth (unleavened bread). From the bigger context I think it becomes clear, that the old leaven also refers to those, who ought to be excluded from the church community as the last step of church discipline, which means that malice and evil are intimately connected with those, that are attending church, but living an immoral life. For both of these exhortations there is one foundation, namely Christ having been sacrificed for us, as our passover lamb. That shouldn't be much of a surprise for a Christian, but for me it is really encouraging to see how Christ-centered the Bible really is and that it is not man with lofty ideas, who created some strange cult around Jesus. He really is the foundation in every part of our lives. Our celebration of that must be as God commands. The perfect lamb has been provided. Now there's the unleavened bread, that's necessary also. God has provided that one, too (7c says that they really are unleavened), but we have to keep the lump unleavened. The church must stay clean. I was wondering whether verse 7d is the ground for 7a-c and all of verse 8 an inference from the whole of verse 7, but decided to put 7d in the middle as a supporting statement for what comes above and below. My main reason for that is, that I don't see verses 7a-c (put away the old, get the new) being much of a reason for verse 8 (THEREFORE don't celebrate with the old, but with the new). Rather vese 7a-c and 8a-c are both exhortations founded on 7d. I'm not really satisfied with the two biggest arcs 6a-b = Ground and 7-8 = Inference. My thinking went like this: Paul introduces a new picture and he explains to them, what this picture is about. (Idea - Explanation) But he also tells them that the present situation is not good and because of that, they have to do some changes (Ground - Inference). I decided to take the second relationship because verses 7-8 are all about how they should change the bad present situation instead of boasting. Maybe it could be even a +/- relationship, but I'm not sure about that and any help is greatly appreciated. notes
Arc
2011-02-25 03:24:33
2011-02-27 08:48:29
editing
1 Corinthians
1 Corinthians 5:6-8
NT
tisch
esv
Οὐ καλὸν τὸ καύχημα ὑμῶν.
Your boasting is not good.
οὐκ οἴδατε ὅτι μικρὰ ζύμη ὅλον τὸ φύραμα ζυμοῖ;
Do you not know that a little leaven leavens the whole lump? (rhetorical question restated: A little leaven leavens the whole lump )
ideaexplanation
ἐκκαθάρατε τὴν παλαιὰν ζύμην,
Cleanse out the old leaven
ἵνα ἦτε νέον φύραμα,
that you may be a new lump,
καθώς ἐστε ἄζυμοι·
as you really are unleavened.
ground
actionpurpose
καὶ γὰρ τὸ πάσχα ἡμῶν ἐτύθη Χριστός·
For Christ, our Passover lamb, has been sacrificed.
ὥστε ἑορτάζωμεν,
Let us therefore celebrate the festival,
μὴ ἐν ζύμῃ παλαιᾷ μηδὲ ἐν ζύμῃ κακίας καὶ πονηρίας,
not with the old leaven, the leaven of malice and evil,
ἀλλ’ ἐν ἀζύμοις εἰλικρινίας καὶ ἀληθείας.
but with the unleavened bread of sincerity and truth.
negativepositive
actionmanner
bilateral
inference
discourse
10000000069566 69566 Arc 2011-02-25 03:24:33 2011-02-27 08:48:29 editing 1 Corinthians 5 6 5 8 1 Corinthians 5:6-8 46 NT tisch esv i649116 i649117 i649107 Οὐ καλὸν τὸ καύχημα ὑμῶν. Your boasting is not good. i649108 οὐκ οἴδατε ὅτι μικρὰ ζύμη ὅλον τὸ φύραμα ζυμοῖ; Do you not know that a little leaven leavens the whole lump? (rhetorical question restated: A little leaven leavens the whole lump ) ideaexplanation 1 i649118 i649119 i649109 ἐκκαθάρατε τὴν παλαιὰν ζύμην, Cleanse out the old leaven i649120 i649110 ἵνα ἦτε νέον φύραμα, that you may be a new lump, i649111 καθώς ἐστε ἄζυμοι· as you really are unleavened. ground 1 actionpurpose 2 i649112 καὶ γὰρ τὸ πάσχα ἡμῶν ἐτύθη Χριστός· For Christ, our Passover lamb, has been sacrificed. i649121 i649113 ὥστε ἑορτάζωμεν, Let us therefore celebrate the festival, i649122 i649114 μὴ ἐν ζύμῃ παλαιᾷ μηδὲ ἐν ζύμῃ κακίας καὶ πονηρίας, not with the old leaven, the leaven of malice and evil, i649115 ἀλλ’ ἐν ἀζύμοις εἰλικρινίας καὶ ἀληθείας. but with the unleavened bread of sincerity and truth. negativepositive 2 actionmanner 1 bilateral 1 inference 2 1 1 1 tisch 25 esv 25 a 50 discourse
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